Table of Contents

Appendices:
Intro

Charles Webster Leadbeater 1854-1934 
A Biographical Study
by Gregory John Tillett
Table of Contents

Appendix 2

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Appendix 1: The  Evolution of Life

          Leadbeater's Theosophy placed great emphasis on the concept of evolution;  his focus was on the evolution of "life" or "spirit'", rather than physical body or "form".  All life - mineral, vegetable, animal and human, as well as manifestations of life beyond those kingdoms - was believed to be evolving, moving from the simple to the complex, from the "material" to the "spiritual".

          "It should be remembered that from the First Logos, which stands next to the Absolute, emanates the Second or Dual Logos, from which in turn comes the Third.   From that Third Logos comes forth the Seven Great Logoi, called sometimes the Seven Spirits before the throne of God;  and as the divine outbreathing pours itself ever further and further outward and downward, from each of these we have upon the next plane seven Logoi also, together making up on that next plane forty-nine.  It will be observed that we have already passed through many stages on the great downward sweep towards matter;  yet, emitting the detail of intermediate hierarchies, it is said that to each of these forty-nine belong millions of solar systems, each energized and controlled by its own solar Logos."  - The Christian Creed, 1920: 34-5

          "Theosophy recognizes seven kingdoms of Nature, because it regards man as separate from the animal kingdom and it takes into account several stages of evolution which are unseen by the physical eye, and gives to them the medieval name of 'elemental kingdom'.   The divine Life pours itself into matter from above and its whole course may be thought of in two stages - the gradual assumption of grosser and grosser matter, and then the gradual casting off again of the vehicles which have been assumed."  - A Textbook of Theosophy, 1971: 28-9

          "The whole process is one of steady evolution from lower forms to higher, from the simpler to the more complex.  But what is evolving is not primarily the form, but the life within it.  These forms also evolve and grow better as time passes;  but this is in order that they may be appropriate vehicles for more and more advanced forms waves of life."  - ibid:32


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1. The Descent Into Matter

       

          "It will be seen that on the seventh or highest plane of our system the triple manifestation of our logos is imaged by three circles, representing His three aspects.   Each of these aspects appears to have its own quality and power.  To the First Aspect He does not manifest Himself on any plane below the highest, but in the second He descends to the sixth plane, and draws round Himself a garment of its matter, this making a quite separate and lower expression of Himself.  In the Third Aspect He descends to the upper portion of the fifth plane, and draws round Himself matter of that level, thus making a third manifestation. - Man Visible and Invisible, 1902:29

          "It is from this Third Aspect that the first movement towards the formation of the system comes.  Previous to this movement we have in existence nothing but the atomic state of matter in each of the planes of nature, none of the aggregations or combinations which make up the lower sub-planes of each having yet been formed.  But into this sea of virgin matter (the true Virgin Maria) pours down the Holy Spirit, the Lifegiver, as He is called in the Nicene Creed;  and by the action of His glorious vitality the atoms are awakened to new powers and possibilities of attraction and repulsion, and thus the lower subdivisions of each plane come into existence." - ibid:36


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2. The Evolution of Life

         

          Based on C. Jinarajadasa, First Principles of Theosophy, 1922:19


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3. The Evolutionary Status of Men

     

          Based on C. Jinarajadasa, First Principles of Theosophy, 1922:35, 37


Table of Contents

Appendices:
Intro

Charles Webster Leadbeater 1854-1934 
A Biographical Study
by Gregory John Tillett
Table of Contents

Appendix 2